Jan. 6 congressional panel seeks testimony from Nevada political operatives

The congressional committee investigating the causes of the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol issued subpoenas Monday for documents and testimony from Dustin Stockton and Jennifer Lynn Lawrence, two Nevada-based political operatives.

Stockton — who is Lawrence’s fiance, according to the committee — did not respond to texts from The Nevada Independent seeking comment.

The couple later released a statement in which they said they want to tell their side of the story, but did not say if they would comply with the panel’s requests. 

“We aren’t surprised by that [sic] the committee issued us subpoenas and have been expecting them,” the couple said. “We are concerned that the timing during the week of Thanksgiving, while most normal business is closed, is further demonstration that the committee is not acting in good faith.”

“In the many months since January 6th we have granted many reporters and outlets extensive on-the-record interviews because we are committed to getting to the truth about what happened,” the couple continued. “We remain committed to that transparency and pray for the opportunity to share our experiences to the public without the taint of misinformation that has become customary.” 

In its press release, the committee misspelled Stockton’s first name, which he noted on Twitter.  

The committee said in letters to each that the couple assisted in organizing the rally that was held near the White House just before the Capitol riot. The committee requested documents and for both of them to testify before the panel. Stockton’s appearance was scheduled for Dec. 14 and Lawrence’s for Dec. 15.  

At the rally on the Ellipse, former President Donald Trump urged Vice President Mike Pence not to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election. He also urged his supporters to “fight like hell. And if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore.”

The committee cited press reports that Stockton and other organizers “collectively communicated” with Trump, former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and others about the rally and other events planned to coincide with certification of the 2020 presidential election results. It also cited press reports that Stockton was so concerned that the “Stop the Steal” movement would organize an unpermitted march on the Capitol that he felt the need to warn the White House about possible danger. 

“Accordingly, the Select Committee seeks documents and a deposition regarding these and other matters that are within the scope of the Select Committee’s inquiry,” the panel said to each in separate letters. 

Stockton and Lawrence previously worked for Trump adviser Steve Bannon’s effort to solicit private funds to build a wall on the southern border. Their home was raided by federal agents after Bannon’s “We Build the Wall'' group was charged with defrauding donors. Bannon, a one-time Trump White House official, was later pardoned by Trump and the charges subsequently dropped. 

Bannon has also been subpoenaed by the panel and is fighting their efforts. Last month, the House voted to hold Bannon in contempt. He was later indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of refusing to testify or provide documents. He has pleaded not guilty.

Along with Stockton and Lawrence, three other people were also subpoenaed on Monday. They include Roger Stone, a Republican strategist and self-described “dirty trickster,” and Alex Jones, a conservative talk radio host known for denying that the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, actually occurred.

This story was updated on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021 at 7:50 p.m. to include a statement from Dustin Stockton and Jennifer Lynn Lawrence.