Coronavirus Contextualized, 49th edition: Cases, hospitalizations continue to decrease as state prepares to open 100 percent

Welcome to the 49th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized.”

For more than a year, we have brought you the latest COVID-19 numbers in Nevada, including COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths, and provided context to them on a near-weekly basis through this series. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

As noted in the last few editions, we plan to continue providing you with the data you need to know about COVID-19 in Nevada for as long as necessary. However, “Coronavirus Contextualized” now publishes on a semi-regular basis, which means we may occasionally skip a Friday or two if there are no new trends to report.

Don’t fear though: You’ll still be able to continue to find the latest data daily on our COVID-19 data page and on Twitter. As always, you can reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any questions.

Below, we explore how COVID-19 cases and hospitalization numbers have remained low as the vaccination effort continues and the state continues to open up — with every county expected to be fully open as of Tuesday.

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported each day has been steadily declining over the last two weeks.

As of Thursday, an average of 209 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down from 267 the week before and 381 the week before that. The last time the seven-day average was lower than it is now was June 12, 2020, right around when COVID-19 cases first started to climb after Nevada started to reopen following the spring shut down.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020, there have been 323,481 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. A little less than 3 percent of those cases, 9,396 have been diagnosed in the last month, and 0.5 percent, or 1,463 cases, have been reported in the last week.

For comparison, the number of COVID-19 cases reported in the last week is about half of the cases Nevada was seeing on average reported each day during the worst of the pandemic this fall. On Dec. 10, the peak, the seven-day average hit 2,736.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1 in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus.

At the same time, the test positivity rate, which looks at the percentage of tests coming back positive out of the total tested, has been steadily decreasing for about a month.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 4.21 percent, down from 4.8 percent the week before and 5.34 percent the week before that. The test positivity rate is now, once again, below the World Health Organization’s recommended 5 percent threshold.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 1.6 million people — roughly 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 3.3 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

As of Thursday, nearly 45 percent of Nevadans have been either partially or fully vaccinated against COVID-19, and 42 percent of Nevadans eligible for the vaccine have yet to receive it.

Since vaccinations started in December, nearly 2.5 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from nearly 2.4 million last week. In total, nearly 1.4 million people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and more than 1.1 million Nevadans have been fully vaccinated. Nevada has received more than 2.8 million doses of the vaccine for distribution.

The pace of vaccine distribution has continued to generally slow. As of Thursday, about 13,000 vaccines were being reported administered each day over the last seven days, down from about 16,000 last week and a high of nearly 30,000 on April 15.

Among the counties, Carson City has the highest percentage of residents partially or fully vaccinated against COVID-19 at 48.5 percent, followed by Washoe County at 47.5 percent, Douglas County at 44.6 percent, and Clark County at 39.9 percent. Tiny Storey County has vaccinated the least, with only 14.2 percent of its residents partially or fully vaccinated.

As the federal government continues to forge ahead with its goal of vaccinating 70 percent of American adults with at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by July 4, Nevada continues to lag. As of Thursday, Nevada has given 56.4 percent of the adult population, or about 1.3 million adults, at least one dose of the vaccine. 

Nationally, Nevada ranks 32nd among the 50 states for percentage of adults given first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, trailing almost all of its neighboring states except Idaho, which comes in at 44th with 49.6 percent vaccinated. California ranks 12th, at 69.1 percent; Oregon ranks 20th at 64.9 percent; Utah ranks 25th at 60.3 percent; and Arizona ranks 31st at 57.1 percent.

To reach 70 percent, Nevada will need to vaccinate about 325,000 more adults. With an average of 7,000 first doses a day being administered, if all of those shots were given to adults, the state would hit the 70 percent vaccination goal in 46 days — on July 12.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths reported on average each day has continued to generally decline, with some day-to-day fluctuations.

As of Thursday, four deaths were being reported on average each day over the prior seven days, roughly unchanged from last week and slightly down from five deaths two weeks ago.

Over the last seven days, 28 COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 24 in Clark County
  • 3 in Washoe County
  • 1 in Nye County

Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 5,578 deaths from COVID-19. In the last month, 134 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 2 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County has had the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Nye County at 23 and Carson City at 22.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to decline, again setting a new record low of 243 on Wednesday, the last day for which data is available. The previous record low, 259, was set on March 28, before hospitalizations started to fluctuate for a few weeks.

Nevada hit peak hospitalizations during the fall surge at 2,025 on Dec. 13.

“Nevada continues to see hospitalizations and all critical metrics near the bottom of the scale,” the Nevada Hospital Association wrote in its weekly report. “Nevada has not witnessed any significant hospitalization increases since the counties lightened social distancing protocols on 1 May 2021.”

County by county

Four of the state’s 17 counties — Douglas, Elko, Eureka and Lincoln — are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

While Eureka and Lincoln are flagged for a too low test rate combined with a too high test positivity rate — metrics that are now less concerning as counties may be testing less as more residents get vaccinated — Douglas and Elko are flagged for all three metrics, including a too high case rate.

Elko has a case rate of 296 per 100,000 over the last 30 days, while  Douglas has a case rate of 217. A third county, Lander, has the highest case rate, 300, but isn’t flagged because it doesn't meet either of the other two other criteria.

No other counties have an elevated case rate and, in fact, nine counties, including both Clark and Washoe counties, aren’t flagged for any criteria at all.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 48th edition: Cases, hospitalizations in Nevada remain steady as CDC announces vaccinated people can go without masks in most places

Welcome to the 48th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized.”

For more than a year, we have brought you the latest COVID-19 numbers in Nevada, including COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths, and provided context to them on a near-weekly basis through this series. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

As noted in the last few editions, we plan to continue providing you with the data you need to know about COVID-19 in Nevada for as long as necessary. However, “Coronavirus Contextualized” now publishes on a semi-regular basis, which means we may occasionally skip a Friday or two if there are no new trends to report.

Don’t fear though: You’ll still be able to continue to find the latest data daily on our COVID-19 data page and on Twitter. As always, you can reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any questions.

Below, we look at the relatively steady numbers of new cases and hospitalizations being reported each day as the vaccination effort expands to adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 and as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Thursday that vaccinated people can now go without masks in most indoor and outdoor places.

Gov. Steve Sisolak’s office confirmed in a press release that Nevada will be following the new federal guidance, as the governor’s latest emergency directive aligned state mask policy with the CDC’s rules.

“The updated guidance on masks issued today by the CDC is effective immediately in Nevada,” the release said.

Businesses, however, may still ask to confirm vaccination status of individuals and reserve the right to keep mask policies in place, and the Clark County Commission has placed an emergency item on the agenda for its Tuesday meeting to discuss the latest mask guidance in relation to the county’s local mitigation and enforcement plan.

Without further ado, the latest on COVID-19 in Nevada:

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases being reported each day remains relatively level.

As of Thursday, an average of 381 cases were reported each day over the last seven days. The seven-day case average has hovered steadily between 300 and 400 for the last 26 days except for one day when it dipped below 300.

Those case numbers are slightly up from the recent low of 239 on March 23 but significantly down from the peak of the case surge this fall, when the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 320,150 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. A little more than 3 percent of those cases, 11,361 have been diagnosed in the last month, and 0.8 percent, or 2,668 cases, have been reported in the last week.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 1 in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus.

Meanwhile, Nevada’s test positivity rate, which looks at the percentage of tests coming back positive out of the total tested, has started to see some small but steady decreases.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 5.36 percent, down from 5.62 percent the week before.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 1.6 million people — roughly 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 3.2 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

As of Thursday, nearly 42 percent of Nevadans have been either partially or fully vaccinated against COVID-19, and 45 percent of Nevadans eligible for the vaccine have yet to receive it.

Since vaccinations started in December, more than 2.2 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from 2.1 million last week. In total, nearly 1.3 million people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and more than 1 million Nevadans have been fully vaccinated. Nevada has received nearly 2.7 million doses of the vaccine for distribution.

The pace of vaccine distribution has, however, been slowing. As of Thursday, about 17,000 vaccines were being reported administered each day over the last seven days, down from a high of nearly 30,000 on April 15.

That pace may, however, pick up in the coming days as a result of adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 becoming eligible for the Pfizer vaccine this week. There are about 178,000 Nevadans in that age group, representing a little more than 5 percent of the population. 

That leaves only about 13 percent of the state’s population, children under the age of 12, who are not eligible for the vaccine.

Among the counties, Carson City has the highest percentage of residents partially or fully vaccinated against COVID-19 at 45.2 percent, followed by Washoe County at 44.5 percent and Douglas County at 41.3 percent. Populous Clark County has vaccinated 37.3 percent of its residents. Tiny Storey County has vaccinated the least, with only 13.3 percent of its residents partially or fully vaccinated.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths reported on average each day has decreased over the last two weeks.

As of Thursday, five deaths were being reported on average each day over the prior seven days, slightly down from eight two weeks ago and significantly down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14.

Over the last seven days, 33 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 28 in Clark County
  • 5 in Washoe County

Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 5,523 deaths from COVID-19. In the last month, 185 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 3 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County has had the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Nye County at 23 and Carson City at 22.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to remain relatively steady.

There were 336 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available. Hospitalizations have fluctuated between 300 and 400 consistently for the last 24 days.

The state hit a record low number of hospitalizations, 259, on March 28. Hospitalizations peaked during the fall surge at 2,025 on Dec. 13.

The Nevada Hospital Association, in its weekly report, noted that while COVID-19 hospitalizations are fluctuating, “no organized wave is forming.”

“Nevada has effectively ‘flattened the curve’ through the use of vaccines,” the association noted.

County by county

Five of the state’s 17 counties — Douglas, Lyon, Storey, Esmeralda and Elko — are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Esmeralda is flagged for all three metrics. Douglas and Lyon are flagged for a too high case rate combined with a too high test positivity rate. Elko and Storey are flagged for having a too high test positivity rate combined with a too low testing rate.

Carson City continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 306 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days, followed by Lyon at 279, Clark at 258 and Washoe at 218. Four other counties have a case rate above 200.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 47th edition: Cases, hospitalizations slightly up though not yet ‘cause for alarm,’ state officials say

Welcome to the 47th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized.”

For more than a year now, we have brought you the latest COVID-19 numbers in Nevada, including COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths, and provided context to them on a near-weekly basis through this series. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

As noted in the last two editions, we plan to continue providing you with the data you need to know about COVID-19 in Nevada for as long as necessary. However, “Coronavirus Contextualized” now publishes on a semi-regular basis, which means we may occasionally skip a Friday or two if there are no new trends to report.

Don’t fear though: You’ll still be able to continue to find the latest data daily on our COVID-19 data page and on Twitter. As always, you can reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any questions.

Below, we explore the slightly elevated case and hospitalization numbers as the vaccination effort continues across the state and as counties prepare to reopen further next month.

Cases and test positivity

While cases continue to generally slowly increase, they appear slightly down this week from the prior week. That’s because the seven-day average was briefly inflated following a couple of days in mid-April in which hundreds of backlogged cases were reported.

As of Thursday, an average of 369 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down from 481 a week ago. Cases, though, are still generally higher than they were at their lowest point last month, when the state hit 239 on March 23.

It’s important to note, however, that the number of new cases reported each day remains at a generally low level. At the peak of the case surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10. The previous low point, in mid-September, was 267.

Kyra Morgan, state biostatistician, attributed the increases to a combination of the state increasing capacity limits to 50 percent and behavior changes from the general public who might be, as she said, “letting their guard down from the low numbers.”

“It’s not necessarily unexpected or cause for alarm at this time,” Morgan said.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 312,306 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. A little more than 3 percent of those cases, 10,893 have been diagnosed in the last month, and 0.8 percent, or 2,583 cases, have been reported in the last week.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 1 in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus.

Nevada’s test positivity rate, which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested, also started to see a bit of an increase this week.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 11.3 percent as of Thursday. That’s significantly down from a high point of 45.6 percent on Dec. 13.

Another way of looking at test positivity is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 5.8 percent, up from a low point of 4.2 percent in early April. 

That number has stabilized in recent days after a couple of weeks of day over day increases, though it is still above the 5 percent threshold recommended by the World Health Organization for reopening.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 1.5 million people — roughly 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 3.1 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

More than a third of Nevadans are now either fully or partially vaccinated against COVID-19.

Since vaccinations started in December, more than 1.9 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from 1.5 million two weeks ago. In total, nearly 1.2 million people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and nearly 800,000 people have been fully vaccinated.

That means that 37.4 percent of Nevadans have been either fully or partially vaccinated. Nevada has received nearly 2.3 million doses of the vaccine for distribution.

According to the CDC, Nevada has received the 3rd fewest doses per capita of any state — the state was at 4th two weeks ago — at 75,750 per 100,000 residents. Alaska has still received the most doses per capita at 102,687 per 100,000. The federal government has told state officials that it is using the 2018 American Community Survey population numbers, which may not accurately reflect Nevada’s current population, to allocate doses to states.

Nevada ranks 37th for doses administered per capita but 16th for doses administered as a percentage of doses received.

Among the counties, Carson City residents have received the most doses per capita, at about 6,700 per 10,000 residents, followed by Douglas at 6,500 and Washoe County at 6,100. Clark County ranks 6th at 5,700.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths reported each day remains relatively low.

As of Thursday, 6 deaths were being reported on average each day over the prior seven days, slightly down from 7 last week and significantly down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14. At the last low point on October 27, an average of 4 deaths were being reported on average each day.

Over the last seven days, 41 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 34 in Clark County
  • 4 in Washoe County
  • 3 in Lyon County

Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 5,400 deaths from COVID-19. In the last month, 225 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 4 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County has had the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Nye County at 23 and Carson City at 22.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations are fluctuating, though they are up from a low point last month.

There were 348 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, slightly down from 380 a week ago. The low point in the last week was 335 and the high point was 427.

The state hit a record low number of hospitalizations, 259, on March 28. Hospitalizations peaked during the fall surge at 2,025 on Dec. 13.

The Nevada Hospital Association, in its weekly report, noted that “significant increases” in hospitalizations may occur as health and safety restrictions continue to be lifted, but that hospitals are much better prepared than they were.

“Increases in hospitalizations would not be unfathomable and could be appropriately managed within the Nevada hospital system,” the association wrote. “The current situation is different than last summer. Hospitals have learned to adapt, treating thousands of COVID-19 patients.”

County by county

Four of the state’s 17 counties — Carson, Lyon, Elko and Lincoln — are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Carson and Lyon are flagged for a too high case rate combined with a too high test positivity rate, while Lincoln and Elko are flagged for a too low test rate and a too high test positivity rate.

Carson City continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 456 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days, followed by Washoe at 305, Lyon at 283, Clark at 239 and Churchill at 220. No other counties currently have an elevated case rate.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 46th edition: Cases, hospitalizations see small increase as vaccine rollout expands

Welcome to the 46th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized.”

For more than a year now, we have brought you the latest COVID-19 numbers in Nevada, including COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths, and provided context to them on a near-weekly basis through this series. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

As noted in the last edition, we plan to continue providing you with the data you need to know about COVID-19 in Nevada for as long as necessary. However, “Coronavirus Contextualized” now publishes on a semi-regular basis, which means we may occasionally skip a Friday or two if there are no new trends to report.

Don’t fear though: You’ll still be able to continue to find the latest data daily on our COVID-19 data page and on Twitter. As always, you can reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any questions.

Below, we explore a recent uptick in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which comes as the vaccine rollout ramps up with an expansion of eligibility to those 16 and older this week.

Cases and test positivity

After three months of relatively steady declines and plateaus, the average number of COVID-19 cases reported each day saw a small uptick this week.

An average of 313 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, up slightly from the recent low point of 239 on March 23. While that average has fluctuated over the last six weeks, five of the last seven days saw the seven-day average increase from the prior day.

It’s important to note, though, that the number of new cases reported each day remains at a low level. At the peak of the case surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10. The previous low point, in mid-September, was 267.

Caleb Cage, Nevada’s COVID-19 response director, described the increasing trend in cases as “very slight” during a press call this week.

“This is not unusual or out of line from what we’ve seen previously as we have loosened restrictions,” Cage said. “While we are closer to the end than the beginning, we must continue to follow mitigation measures to help slow the spread.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 306,358 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. A little more than 3 percent of those cases, 9,863 have been diagnosed in the last month, and 0.7 percent, or 2,189 cases, have been reported in the last week. Both of those percentages are slightly up from those seen two weeks ago.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 1 in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus.

Nevada’s test positivity rate, which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested, also started to see a bit of an increase this week.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 9.7 percent as of Thursday. That number, however, has been affected by both unusually low and unusually high single-day test positivity rates in the last week, which makes it difficult to see how the data are trending.

Another way of looking at test positivity, which may be more helpful to look at this week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 4.7 percent, up from a low point of 4.2 percent, where the rate had been for six consecutive days until Sunday. 

That number, though, is still significantly down from a high of 21.4 percent in mid-January and remains under the 5 percent threshold recommended by the World Health Organization for reopening.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 1.5 million people — roughly 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 3 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

Nearly two-thirds of Nevadans are now either fully or partially vaccinated against COVID-19.

Since vaccinations started in December, more than 1.5 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from nearly 1.4 million last week. In total, 957,169 people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and 586,035 people have been fully vaccinated.

That means that 31.1 percent of Nevadans have been either fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has received nearly 2 million doses of the vaccine for distribution.

According to the CDC, Nevada has received the fourth fewest doses per capita of any state — the state was at 8th two weeks ago — at 64,171 per 100,000 residents. Alaska has still received the most doses per capita at 94,730 per 100,000. The federal government has told state officials that it is using the 2018 American Community Survey population numbers, which may not accurately reflect Nevada’s current population, to allocate doses to states.

Nevada continues to fall in the national ranking by state of doses administered per capita. It now stands at having administered the 38th most doses, down from 35th two weeks ago. Nevada now ranks 21st for doses administered as a percentage of doses received, down from 16th two weeks ago.

Among the counties, Mineral County residents have received the most doses per capita, at about 5,600 per 10,000 residents, followed by White Pine County at 5,500 and Carson City and Douglas County, each at 5,200. Clark County now ranks 6th, up from 8th two weeks ago, at 4,500, while Washoe ranks 5th, up from 6th, at 4,800.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths reported each day is back up after a brief weeklong dip.

As of Thursday, 8 deaths were being reported on average each day over the last seven days, up from 6 last week but consistent with the 8 reported the week before that. Those numbers are all significantly down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14. At the last low point on Oct. 27, an average of 4 deaths were being reported on average each day.

Over the last seven days, 57 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 46 in Clark County
  • 6 in Nye County
  • 3 in Washoe County
  • 1 in Elko and Lincoln counties

Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 5,313 deaths from COVID-19. In the last month, 273 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 5 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County continues to have the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Nye County at 23 and Carson City at 22.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations have started to creep back up as well.

There were 341 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, up from 273 a week ago. 

The state hit a record low number of hospitalizations, 259, on March 28. Hospitalizations peaked during the fall surge at 2,025 on Dec. 13.

The Nevada Hospital Association, in its weekly report, noted that it was seeing increases in hospital volume as it predicted last week.

“However, we believe the increases will be at a slower tempo and will not overpower hospital capacity based on the appreciated vaccine effectiveness and the public’s continued willingness to receive the vaccine,” the association wrote. “In the meantime, the continued need for social distancing and individual responsibility cannot be understated.”

County by county

Only one of the state’s 17 counties, Lyon, is considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Lyon County is flagged for a too high case and test positivity rate.

Carson City continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 354 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Washoe County comes in second at 284 followed by Lyon at 229. No other counties currently have an elevated case rate.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 45th edition: More than a quarter of Nevadans vaccinated as Nevada again hits record low hospitalizations

Welcome to the 45th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized.”

It’s been nearly a year since the first installment of this series published on April 1, 2020. Since then, we have brought you the latest COVID-19 numbers in Nevada — including confirmed cases of COVID-19, people tested, hospitalizations and deaths and provided context to them — on a near-weekly basis. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

Moving forward, we plan to continue providing you the latest data you need to know about COVID-19 in Nevada through this series for as long as necessary. However, as the trends in the data stabilize, we will be moving to publish installments of “Coronavirus Contextualized” on a semi-regular basis. What that means: This series will still publish on Fridays but we may occasionally skip a Friday or two if there are no new trends to report.

Don’t fear though: You’ll still be able to continue to find the latest data daily on our COVID-19 data page and on Twitter. As always, you can reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any questions.

Below, in this week’s edition, we take a look at the latest COVID-19 trends as the state prepares to open up vaccine eligibility to all Nevadans 16 and older in just a little over a week.

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported each day in Nevada dropped to its lowest level since mid-June this week. That means cases are finally lower than their lowest point in September, before the fall surge.

As of Thursday, an average of 252 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down from 378 last week. On Tuesday, they were even lower at 239. Cases have not been that low since June 17, when the seven-day average was 234

At the peak of the case surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10. The low point before cases started to increase in mid-September was 267.

Caleb Cage, Nevada’s COVID-19 response director, said on a press call this week that the state will continue to monitor the data as it prepares for a transition to local control of many COVID-19 health and safety measures — not including mask wearing and social distancing — but that the trends are looking up.

“We know that there are some hopeful signs right now and some reasons to believe that the vaccine is having a significant impact on our ability to stop or slow the spread of this virus,” Cage said.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 302,250 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. Three percent of those cases, 9,503 have been diagnosed in the last month, and half a percent, or 1,764 cases, have been reported in the last week.

One in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus since the beginning of the pandemic.

Nevada’s test positivity rate, which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested, also continues to decline.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 9.9 percent as of Thursday, down from 14.4 percent last week and significantly down from a high of 45.9 percent on Dec. 13. Before the fall surge, the test positivity rate was 9.2 percent.

One of the drawbacks, however, of looking at test positivity using individual people is that some people are tested repeatedly. Someone who tested negative four times but tested positive on their fifth time would be counted as a new positive person but not a new person tested. (In other words, they would be counted in the numerator but not the denominator.) That’s why the test positivity rates calculated this way look so high.

Another way of looking at test positivity, as we have noted each week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 4.5 percent, down from a high of 21.6 percent in mid-January and finally under the 5 percent threshold recommended by the World Health Organization for reopening. The last time test positivity was this low was mid-June.

Whichever method you use, the trend is still the same: Statewide test positivity continues to decline.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1.5 million people — roughly 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 2.9 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

More than a quarter of Nevadans are now either fully or partially vaccinated against COVID-19.

Since vaccinations started in December, 1,214,518 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from 1,062,287 last week. In total, 776,760 people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and 433,856 people have been fully vaccinated.

That means that 25.2 percent of Nevadans have been either fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has received more than 1.5 million doses of the vaccine for distribution.

According to the CDC, Nevada has received the 8th fewest doses per capita of any state — the state was at 7th last week — at 49,075 per 100,000 residents. Alaska has still received the most doses per capita at 75,090 per 100,000. The federal government has told state officials that it is using the 2018 American Community Survey population numbers, which may not accurately reflect Nevada’s current population, to allocate doses to states.

Nevada has slightly fallen in the national ranking of doses administered per capita by each state this week. It now stands at having administered the 35th most doses, down from 32nd last week. Nevada also continues to rank 16th for doses administered as a percentage of doses received, at 80 percent.

Among the counties, White Pine County still has administered the most doses per capita, at about 6,500 vaccines administered per 10,000 residents, followed by Mineral County at 5,700 and Churchill at 4,100. Clark County now ranks 8th, up from 9th, at 3,700, while Washoe still ranks 6th at 3,800. In this ranking, the Quad Counties — that is, Carson City and Douglas, Lyon and Storey counties — and Nye and Esmeralda counties are grouped together because they are coordinating vaccine distribution efforts.

It’s also important to note that these numbers are a rough approximation, as shots are reported based on the county where they were administered, not where the person they were given to lives.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths reported each day is slightly down from last week though the level of deaths being reported each day is still much higher than it was at the last low point in October.

As of Thursday, 9 deaths were being reported on average each day over the last seven days, down from 11 last week and a high of 45 on Jan. 14. At the last low point on October 27, an average of 4 deaths were being seen each day.

Over the last seven days, 60 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 40 in Clark County
  • 5 each in Carson City and Nye County
  • 4 in Washoe County
  • 3 in Lyon County
  • 2 in Douglas County
  • 1 in Lincoln County

Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 5,217 deaths from COVID-19. In the last month, 284 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 5 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County continues to have the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Carson City at 22 and Nye County at 21.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations hit a new record low of 273 on Wednesday, the last day for which data is available.

That’s down from 331 last week. The previous record low number of hospitalizations earlier this year, 316, was reported on May 30. Hospitalizations have been fluctuating between 273 and 331 for the last two weeks.

“The declines in confirmed COVID-19 cases have continued in week 13, although the rate of drop is slowing,” the Nevada Hospital Association noted in its weekly report this week.

County by county

Two of the state’s 17 counties, Douglas and Lincoln, are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Douglas County is flagged for a too high case and test positivity rate, while Lincoln County is flagged for a too low test rate and a too high test positivity rate.

Carson City continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 309 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Washoe County comes in second at 267 followed by Lyon County at 238. Three other counties — Douglas, Clark, and Churchill — have elevated case rates but are not flagged for elevated disease transmission because it is the only one of the three criteria they meet. 

Coronavirus Contextualized, 44th edition: Cases surpass 300,000 as vaccines administered crest 1 million

Welcome to the 44th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized,” a recurring feature in which we explore some of the numbers swirling around in the time of coronavirus.

Through these stories, we hope to parse the numbers, including confirmed cases of COVID-19, people tested, number of hospitalizations and deaths, and provide some context to them. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

These stories serve as a written roundup of the COVID-19 trends we kept our eyes on this week, with all graphs and charts living permanently on our COVID-19 data page, where they are updated multiple times a day with the latest numbers. 

We’re continuing to take suggestions for what kind of data, graphs and trends you would like to see analyzed in future versions of this story or included in a future update of our data page. Reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any feedback.

Below, we take a look at the latest COVID-19 trends as many businesses were allowed to expand their capacity to 50 percent this week and as Gov. Steve Sisolak announced that all Nevadans 16 and older will be eligible for the vaccine starting April 5.

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported each day in Nevada has remained at a relative plateau since late February.

As of Thursday, an average of 378 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down slightly from 382 last week. Cases have been relatively steady for the last three weeks, fluctuating between a seven-day average of 340 and 460. (Several days in the last week saw elevated seven-day averages because of backlogged test results reported on March 12.)

At the peak of the surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10; the low point before cases started to increase in mid-September was 267.

State biostatistician Kyra Morgan, at a meeting of the COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force this week, said that the state's vaccination effort likely played a role in how quickly cases dropped from the winter peak and the low level of cases currently being seen.

“Typically, we get worse faster than we recover,” Morgan said. “We haven’t seen that with this particular surge. Our numbers have improved really really quickly at the same kind of rate that they had declined or gotten worse. Vaccines are really the thing that’s different in those two situations.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 300,483 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. Three percent of those cases, 10,508 have been diagnosed in the last month, and less than 1 percent, or 2,643 cases, have been reported in the last week.

One in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus since the beginning of the pandemic.

Nevada’s test positivity rate — which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested — also continues to generally decline.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 14.4 percent as of Thursday, down from 16.6 percent last week and significantly down from a high of 45.9 percent on Dec. 13. Before the fall surge, the test positivity rate was 9.2 percent.

One of the drawbacks, however, of looking at test positivity using individual people is that some people are tested repeatedly. Someone who tested negative four times but tested positive on their fifth time would be counted as a new positive person but not a new person tested. (In other words, they would be counted in the numerator but not the denominator.) That’s why the test positivity rates calculated this way look so high.

Another way of looking at test positivity, as we have noted each week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 5.2 percent, down from a high of 21.6 percent in mid-January and also less than the 6.1 percent test positivity rate the state saw in September before cases started to rise.

That test positivity rate is just right above the World Health Organization’s target test positivity rate of 5 percent.

“These numbers are starting to stabilize,” Morgan told the task force this week. “It could be that we hover right above that 5 percent goal.”

Whichever method you use, the trend  is still the same: Statewide test positivity continues to generally decline.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1.5 million people — roughly 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been about 2.9 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

More than 1 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have now been distributed statewide.

Since vaccinations started in December, 1,062,287 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from 904,504 last week. In total, 672,177 people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and 378,958 people have been fully vaccinated.

That means that nearly 22 percent of Nevadans have been either fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has received more than 1.3 million doses of the vaccine for distribution.

According to the CDC, Nevada has received the 7th fewest doses per capita of any state — the state was at 11th last week — at 42,987 per 100,000 residents. Alaska has received the most doses per capita at 69,582 per 100,000. The federal government has told state officials that it is using the 2018 American Community Survey population numbers, which may not accurately reflect Nevada’s current population, to allocate doses to states.

Nevada has slightly improved in the national ranking of doses administered per capita by each state this week. It now stands at having administered the 32nd most doses, up from 33rd last week. Nevada also ranks 16th for doses administered as a percentage of doses received, at 80 percent.

Among the counties, White Pine County has now administered the most doses per capita, at about 6,500 vaccines administered per 10,000 residents, followed by Mineral County at 5,600 and Churchill at 3,800. Clark County continues to rank 9th at 3,200, while Washoe now ranks 6th, up from 8th, at 3,400. In this ranking, the Quad Counties — that is, Carson City and Douglas, Lyon and Storey counties — and Nye and Esmeralda counties are grouped together because they are coordinating vaccine distribution efforts.

It’s also important to note that these numbers are a rough approximation, as shots are reported based on the county where they were administered, not where the person they were given to lives.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths reported each day has started to plateau, though the level of deaths being seen each day is still much higher than it was at the last low point in October. 

As of Thursday, 11 deaths were being reported on average each day over the last seven days, down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14 and essentially unchanged from last week. At the last low point on October 27, an average of 4 deaths were being seen each day.

Over the last seven days, 77 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 68 in Clark County
  • 6 in Washoe County
  • 2 in Elko County
  • 1 in Mineral County

Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 5,157 deaths from COVID-19. In the last month, 351 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 7 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County continues to have the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Carson City at 21 and Nye and Churchill counties, each at 20.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to remain relatively low statewide.

There were 331 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, down from 347 last week. For several days in the last week, the state saw record low hospitalizations, bottoming out at 298 hospitalizations on Saturday. The previous record low number of hospitalizations, 316, was reported on May 30.

“Declines in COVID-19 hospitalizations continue for the fourteenth straight week,” the Nevada Hospital Association noted in its weekly report this week. “This downward trend started on or about December 17, 2020, and while the descent is slowing down, the numbers continue to shrink.”

County by county

Two of the state’s 17 counties, Douglas and Nye, are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Nye County is flagged for a low test rate coupled with a too high test positivity rate, while Douglas County is flagged for a too high case and test positivity rate.

Carson City now has the highest case rate in the state at 334 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Mineral County comes in second at 307 followed by Douglas County at 270. Four other counties — Washoe, Clark, Churchill and Lyon — have elevated case rates but are not flagged for elevated disease transmission because it is the only one of the three criteria they meet. 

Coronavirus Contextualized, 43rd edition: Vaccinations continue as cases plateau, hospitalizations near lowest-ever point

Welcome to the 43rd installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized,” a recurring feature in which we explore some of the numbers swirling around in the time of coronavirus.

Through these stories, we hope to parse the numbers, including confirmed cases of COVID-19, people tested, number of hospitalizations and deaths, and provide some context to them. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here.

These stories serve as a written roundup of the COVID-19 trends we kept our eyes on this week, with all graphs and charts living permanently on our COVID-19 data page, where they are updated multiple times a day with the latest numbers. 

We’re continuing to take suggestions for what kind of data, graphs and trends you would like to see analyzed in future versions of this story or included in a future update of our data page. Reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any feedback.

Below, we take a look at the latest COVID-19 trends three days before health and safety restrictions loosen further on Monday as part of Gov. Steve Sisolak’s 75-day reopening plan.

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported each day in Nevada continues to remain relatively level.

As of Thursday, an average of 382 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, just slightly up from 346 last week. Cases have been relatively steady for the last three weeks, fluctuating between a seven-day average of 340 and 410.

At the peak of the surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10; the low point before cases started to increase in mid-September was 267.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 297,840 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. Four percent of those cases, 11,307 have been diagnosed in the last month, and less than 1 percent, or 2,673 cases, have been reported in the last week.

One in 10 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus since the beginning of the pandemic.

Nevada’s test positivity rate — which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested — also continues to generally decline.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 16.6 percent as of Thursday, down from 19.8 percent last week and significantly down from a high of 45.9 percent on Dec. 13. Before the fall surge, the test positivity rate was 9.2 percent.

One of the drawbacks, however, of looking at test positivity using individual people is that some people are tested repeatedly. Someone who tested negative four times but tested positive on their fifth time would be counted as a new positive person but not a new person tested. (In other words, they would be counted in the numerator but not the denominator.) That’s why the test positivity rates calculated this way look so high.

Another way of looking at test positivity, as we have noted each week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 6.0 percent, down from a high of 21.6 percent in mid-January and finally less than the 6.2 percent test positivity rate from September before cases started to rise.

Whichever method you use, the trend, generally, is still the same: Statewide test positivity continues to be on an overall decline.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1.4 million people — about 1 in 2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 2.8 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

Since vaccinations started in December, 904,504 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from 750,160 last week. In total, 568,912 people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and 316,682 people have been fully vaccinated.

That means that 1 in 5 Nevadans has either been fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has been distributed nearly 1.2 million doses of the vaccine by the federal government.

According to the CDC, Nevada has received the 11th fewest number of doses per capita from the federal government of any state — the state was at 13th last week — at 37,705 per 100,000 residents. Alaska has received the most doses per capita at 63,274 per 100,000. The federal government has told state officials that it is using the 2018 American Community Survey population numbers, which may not accurately reflect Nevada’s current population, to allocate doses to states.

Nevada improved in the national ranking of doses administered per capita by each state this week. It now stands at having administered the 33rd most doses, up from 37th last week. Nevada also ranks 19th for doses administered as a percentage of doses received, at 78 percent.

Among the counties, Mineral County has still administered the most doses per capita, at about 5,200 vaccines administered per 10,000 residents, followed by White Pine at 4,000 and Eureka at 3,300. Clark County continues to rank 9th at 2,700, while Washoe now ranks 8th, down from 7th, at 3,000. In this ranking, the Quad Counties — that is, Carson City, Douglas, Lyon and Storey counties — and Nye and Esmeralda counties are grouped together because they are coordinating vaccine distribution efforts.

It’s also important to note that these numbers are a rough approximation, as shots are reported based on the county where they were administered, not where the person they were given to lives.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

Deaths from COVID-19 continue to remain far below what they were several weeks ago, though the last week has seen a generally stagnating number of new daily deaths reported each day.

As of Thursday, 11 deaths were being reported on average each day over the last seven days, down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14 but slightly up from 10 last week. Over the last seven days, 75 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 68 in Clark County
  • 5 in Washoe County
  • 1 in each Carson City and Nye County 

In the last month, 441 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, about 9 percent of the deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County has the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Carson City at 21 and Nye and Churchill counties, each at 20.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations in Nevada not only continue to decline across the state but are nearing the state’s record low for hospitalizations set in May before Nevada started reopening businesses.

There were 347 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, down from 407 last week. The record, 2,025 hospitalizations, was set on Dec. 13. The last low point in September was 417. The lowest they have ever been since the beginning of the pandemic was 316, on May 30.

County by county

Only one of the state’s 17 counties, Nye County, is considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. 

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Mineral County continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 417 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Carson City comes in second at 361 and Clark County comes in third at 326. Nine counties have elevated case rates but are not flagged for elevated disease transmission because it is the only one of the three criteria they meet. 

Nye County is not flagged for a high case rate but rather a low number of tests and a too high test positivity rate.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 41st edition: Cases, deaths and hospitalizations all continue to decrease as vaccine rollout progresses

Welcome to the 41st installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized,” a recurring feature in which we explore some of the numbers swirling around in the time of coronavirus.

Through these stories, we hope to parse the numbers, including confirmed cases of COVID-19, people tested, number of hospitalizations and deaths, and provide some context to them. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here on our coronavirus page.

These stories serve as a written roundup of the COVID-19 trends we kept our eyes on this week, with all graphs and charts living permanently on our COVID-19 data page, where they are updated multiple times a day with the latest numbers. 

We’re continuing to take suggestions for what kind of data, graphs and trends you would like to see analyzed in future versions of this story or included in a future update of our data page. Reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any feedback.

Below, we take a look at the latest COVID-19 trends as the number of new cases reported each day continues to decrease and as schools prepare to soon open in Clark County.

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported in Nevada has continued to generally decline, though the last three days have seen a small uptick.

As of Thursday, an average of 396 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down from 492 last week but slightly up from Monday, when the seven-day average hit 344. At the peak of the surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10; the low point before cases started to increase in mid-September was 267.

State biostatistician Kyra Morgan, at a meeting of the state COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force on Thursday, said she anticipates the state still could hit metrics more comparable to what it saw in September, before the fall surge, by the end of the month.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 292,748 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. About 7 percent of those cases, 20,653, have been diagnosed in the last month, and a little less than 1 percent, or 2,773 cases, have been reported in the last week.

One in 11 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus since the beginning of the pandemic. Nevada ranks 17th in the nation for COVID-19 cases per capita, down from 16th last week.

Nevada’s test positivity rate — which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested — also continues to generally decline.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 16.1 percent as of Thursday, down from a high of 45.9 percent on Dec. 13 but still significantly higher than the recent low point before the surge this fall, 9.2 percent on Sept. 17. Thursday’s rate was also slightly up from Monday’s, 14.2 percent.

One of the drawbacks, however, of looking at test positivity using individual people is that some people are tested repeatedly. Someone who tested negative four times but tested positive on their fifth time would be counted as a new positive person but not a new person tested. (In other words, they would be counted in the numerator but not the denominator.) That’s why the test positivity rates calculated this way look so high.

Another way of looking at test positivity, as we have noted each week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 8.6 percent, down from a high of 21.7 percent on Jan. 13. In September, before cases started to increase, the test positivity rate was 6.2 percent.

Whichever method you use, the trend is still the same: Statewide test positivity continues to generally be on the decline.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1.4 million people — about 1 in 2.2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been nearly 2.7 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

Since vaccinations started in December, 622,189 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, up from 466,981 last week. In total, 418,700 first doses and 192,590 second doses have been given.

That means that 1 in 7 Nevadans has either been fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has been distributed 809,180 doses of the vaccine by the federal government.

According to the CDC, Nevada is now receiving the ninth fewest number of doses per capita from the federal government of any state — improved from sixth last week — at 26,271 per 100,000 residents. The federal government has told state officials that it is using the 2018 American Community Survey population numbers to allocate doses to states, though they have not yet provided state officials with the exact formula.

“That may not necessarily meet exactly what our 2020 demography represents,” Candice McDaniel, the state’s top immunization official, said on a press call last week.

Nevada continues to improve in the number of doses it has administered per capita. It now stands at having administered the 34th most doses, up from 41st last week. Nevada also ranks 21st for doses administered as a percentage of doses received, at 76.9 percent.

State data show that a total of 1,463 doses have been lost since December, either because they have been wasted, expired or otherwise were unable to be administered. 

The most common reason doses were unable to be used — which applied to 540 doses — was that they were redistributed Pfizer vaccines thawed by the state and then driven to hospitals to be handed out based on the size of their workforce. However, those doses can only be stored in a refrigerator for a maximum of five days after they are thawed. If demand was low, the hospital may have ended up with thawed Pfizer vaccines at the end of the five-day storage period that had to be discarded, a Department of Health and Human Services spokeswoman said.

Two-hundred doses arrived to counties in a compromised state and had to be replaced by the manufacturer, while another 200 doses were lost generally to storage and handling errors. A total of 178 doses were discarded because the vaccine could not be used quickly enough and the administering provider didn’t have enough appointments to use them.

Other issues included storage and handling errors, dilution errors, dropped vials, leaky syringes, broken needles and contaminated syringes. Seven doses were unaccounted for without any other reason given.

Among the counties, Mineral County has still administered the most doses per capita, at 43,396 vaccines administered per 100,000 residents, followed by White Pine at 33,841 and Lincoln at 24,098. Clark County continues to rank 9th at 17,876, while Washoe now ranks 6th, down from 5th at 22,783

It’s important to note that these numbers are a rough approximation, as shots are reported based on the county where they were administered, not where the person they were given to lives.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths being reported each day continues to decrease.

As of Thursday, 18 deaths were reported on average each day over the last seven days, down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14 and down from 24 last week. Over the last seven days, 127 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 115 in Clark County
  • 7 in Washoe County
  • 3 in Carson City
  • 1 each in Lyon and Nye counties

In the last month, 901 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, a little less than a fifth of the 4,933 total COVID-19 deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County continues to have the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 28 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Carson City, Churchill County and Nye County, each at 20.

Nevada ranks 23rd in the nation for deaths per capita, down from 21st last week.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations in Nevada continue to decline.

There were 532 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, down from 698 last week. The record, 2,025 hospitalizations, was set on Dec. 13. The low point in September was 417.

Nevada now has the 15th highest number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 per capita, down from 6th last week, at 17.3 per 100,000.

County by county

Seven of the state’s 17 counties are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. Those counties are Clark, Elko, Eureka, Lincoln, Mineral, Nye and Pershing.

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Mineral County continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 1,403 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Clark County comes in second at 588 and Pershing County comes in third at 503.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 40th edition: Health officials urge vigilance as decreasing case numbers expected to plateau by March

Welcome to the 40th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized,” a recurring feature in which we explore some of the numbers swirling around in the time of coronavirus.

Through these stories, we hope to parse the numbers, including confirmed cases of COVID-19, people tested, number of hospitalizations and deaths, and provide some context to them. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here on our coronavirus page.

These stories serve as a written roundup of the COVID-19 trends we kept our eyes on this week, with all graphs and charts living permanently on our COVID-19 data page, where they are updated multiple times a day with the latest numbers. 

We’re continuing to take suggestions for what kind of data, graphs and trends you would like to see analyzed in future versions of this story or included in a future update of our data page. Reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any feedback.

Below, we take a look at the latest COVID-19 trends as the number of new reported cases each day continues to decrease and as capacity restrictions on certain businesses started lifting this week.

Cases and test positivity

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported in Nevada continues to decline.

As of Thursday, an average of 492 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down from 677 last week. At the peak of the surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10; the low point before cases started to increase in mid-September was 267.

State biostatistician Kyra Morgan, at a meeting of the state COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force on Thursday, projected the state would hit a low of somewhere between 315 and 320 cases, similar to what was experienced at the end of the summer wave of cases, by the end of the month. However, she noted that at the last low point, in September, the state only saw those numbers stay low for about a two week period.

“When we rebounded from our summer wave, we really just had a very small period, a very short period of what I might call a sustained baseline before we started to see cases increase again and so just want everyone to exercise caution and continue to preface all of this progress with just the idea that we need to continue to be diligent,” Morgan said.  “If we see those numbers reach that baseline around March, just need to be really cautious that we're looking and making sure that we don't see subsequent increases that are significant just shortly thereafter.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 289,975 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. About 9 percent of those cases, 27,035, have been diagnosed in the last month, and a little less than 1 percent, or 3,442 cases, have been reported in the last week.

One in 11 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus since the beginning of the pandemic. Nevada ranks 16th in the nation for COVID-19 cases per capita, the same as last week.

Nevada’s test positivity rate — which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested — also continues to decline.

As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 16.7 percent as of Thursday, down from a high of 45.9 percent on Dec. 13 but still significantly higher than the recent low point before the surge this fall, 9.2 percent on Sept. 17. 

One of the drawbacks, however, of looking at test positivity using individual people is that some people are tested repeatedly. Someone who tested negative four times but tested positive on their fifth time would be counted as a new positive person but not a new person tested. (In other words, they would be counted in the numerator but not the denominator.) That’s why the test positivity rates calculated this way look so high.

Another way of looking at test positivity, as we have noted each week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 11.3 percent, down from a high of 21.7 percent on Jan. 13. In September, before cases started to increase, the test positivity rate was 6.1 percent — meaning that test positivity is still nearly double what it once was.

Whichever method you use, the trend is still the same: Statewide test positivity continues to be on the decline.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1.4 million people — about one in 2.2 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been more than 2.6 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

Since vaccinations started in December, 466,981 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes 346,585 first doses and 118,192 second doses.

That means that one in nine Nevadans has either been fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has been distributed 593,275 doses of the vaccine by the federal government.

According to the CDC, Nevada is now receiving the sixth fewest number of doses per capita from the federal government of any state — up from third last week — at 19,261 per 100,000 residents. It is still unclear what formula the federal government is using to allocate vaccines to states and why Nevada is receiving fewer than other states on a population basis.

Nevada has administered the 10th fewest doses per capita of any state, the same rank as last week. The state, however, falls around the middle of the pack, 22nd fewest, for doses administered as a percentage of doses received at 78.7 percent. That percentage is, however, up from 68.7 percent of doses administered last week.

Among the counties, Mineral County has administered the most doses per capita, at 38,047 vaccines administered per 100,000 residents, followed by White Pine at 30,481 and Eureka at 19,271. Clark County continues to rank 9th at 11,142, while Washoe still ranks fifth at 15,998

It’s important to note that these numbers are a rough approximation, as shots are reported based on the county where they were administered, not where the person they were given to lives.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

The number of new COVID-19 deaths being reported each day is decreasing, though they remain at a still-high level.

As of Thursday, 24 deaths were being reported on average each day over the last seven days, down from a high of 45 on Jan. 14. Over the last seven days, 167 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 147 in Clark County
  • 10 in Washoe County
  • 4 in Douglas County
  • 3 in Nye County
  • 2 in Elko County
  • 1 in Carson City

In the last month, 1,022 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, a fifth of the 4,807 total COVID-19 deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County still has the highest number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 30 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Carson City, Churchill County and Nye County, each at 20.

Nevada ranks 21st in the nation for deaths per capita, the same as last week.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations in Nevada continue to decline.

There were 698 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, down from 879 last week. The record, 2,025 hospitalizations, was set on Dec. 13. The low point in September was 417.

Nevada still has the sixth highest number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 per capita at 24.5 per 100,000, behind New York, Georgia, Arizona, New Jersey and Texas.

Nevada hospitals are currently staffing 7,013 beds, more than the 6,660 they are normally licensed to operate, to keep up with the demand. As of Wednesday, 73 percent of staffed hospital beds and 63 percent of ICU beds were occupied. Those numbers were 77 percent and 68 percent, respectively, in Southern Nevada and 69 percent and 48 percent in Northern Nevada.

County by county

Eight of the state’s 17 counties are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. Those counties are Clark, Elko, Eureka, Lincoln, Mineral, Nye, Pershing and Washoe.

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

There is, however, some talk of the COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force changing these metrics as the vaccination campaign continues and in light of the fact that COVID-19 may become endemic, essentially permanent, like the flu or the common cold.

Morgan, the state biostatistician, noted that the case rate threshold is at 200 but Nevada hasn’t achieved 200 cases a day since the state’s stay-at-home order in March.

“When we look at the criteria for elevated disease transmission, we need to give ourselves the flexibility to understand what a reasonable baseline is and we've learned a lot now compared to what we knew when we came up with that criteria,” Morgan said. “I do think we need to just have a fluid conversation around what is a realistic benchline, so that we're setting goals that are achievable — and still work to keep infrastructure and things like that under control — but so that we just aren’t consistently flagging everyone for a goal that's essentially not ever going to be maintained.”

Mineral County continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 1,491 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Clark County comes in second at 811 and Pershing County comes in third at 575.

Update 2/25/20: This article has been corrected to omit a missing word. Pershing County has the highest death rate per capita of any county in Nevada.

Coronavirus Contextualized, 39th edition: Cases, hospitalizations continue to decrease though still double what they were in September

Welcome to the 39th installment of “Coronavirus Contextualized,” a recurring feature in which we explore some of the numbers swirling around in the time of coronavirus.

Through these stories, we hope to parse the numbers, including confirmed cases of COVID-19, people tested, number of hospitalizations and deaths, and provide some context to them. You can view the prior editions of “Coronavirus Contextualized” here on our coronavirus page.

These stories serve as a written roundup of the COVID-19 trends we kept our eyes on this week, with all graphs and charts living permanently on our COVID-19 data page, where they are updated multiple times a day with the latest numbers. 

We’re continuing to take suggestions for what kind of data, graphs and trends you would like to see analyzed in future versions of this story or included in a future update of our data page. Reach out to megan@thenvindy.com with any feedback.

Below, we take a look at the latest COVID-19 trends as the number of new reported cases each day as Gov. Steve Sisolak on Thursday announced a new reopening plan that gradually loosens restrictions over the next two and a half months, at which point local jurisdictions will be responsible for putting in place their own COVID-19 health and safety measures.

Cases and test positivity

The good news continued for Nevadans this week: As of Thursday, an average of 677 cases were reported each day over the last seven days, down from 950 last week.

At the peak of the surge this fall, the seven-day average was 2,736, on Dec. 10. The low point before cases started to increase in mid-September was 267. That means that while cases are significantly down from the peak, they’re still more than double what they were before the surge.

Since the beginning of the pandemic in March, there have been 286,533 COVID-19 cases reported statewide. About a tenth of those cases, 36,039, have been diagnosed in the last month, and a little less than 2 percent, or 4,742 cases, have been reported in the last week.

One in 11 Nevadans has tested positive for the virus since the beginning of the pandemic. Nevada ranks 16th in the nation for COVID-19 cases per capita, the same as last week.

At the same time, Nevada’s test positivity rate — which looks at the percentage of tests or people coming back positive out of the total tested — remains high, though it continues to decrease day over day. As usual, we’ll look at two different methods of calculating test positivity below, using both individual people and a metric known as testing encounters.

Starting with the number of new reported people who tested positive for COVID-19 out of the total number of new reported people tested each day, the state’s seven-day average test positivity rate was about 22.4 percent as of Thursday, down from a recent high of 45.9 percent on Dec. 13 but still significantly higher than the recent low point before the surge this fall, 9.2 percent on Sept. 17. 

One of the drawbacks, however, of looking at test positivity using individual people is that some people are tested repeatedly. Someone who tested negative four times but tested positive on their fifth time would be counted as a new positive person but not a new person tested. (In other words, they would be counted in the numerator but not the denominator.) That’s why the test positivity rates calculated this way look so high.

Another way of looking at test positivity, as we have noted each week, is to examine test encounters, or the number of individual people tested each day. This method of looking at test positivity excludes duplicate samples collected the same day but accounts for people who are tested repeatedly on different days.

It is not possible to independently calculate the test positivity rate based on test encounters because the state only reports the number of positive cases, not the number of positive test encounters. However, the state does provide this number, calculated as an average over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. As of Wednesday, that number was 14.3 percent, down from a high of 21.7 percent on Jan. 13. In September, before cases started to increase, the test positivity rate was 6.1 percent.

Whichever calculation you use to look at test positivity, the trends are generally the same. Test positivity had been increasing fairly steadily from September through mid-January and is now decreasing.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1.4 million people — about one in 2.3 Nevadans have been tested for COVID-19, and there have been nearly 2.6 million individual testing encounters.

Vaccinations

Since vaccinations started in December, 379,077 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Nevada, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes 299,502 first doses and 77,555 second doses.

(Gov. Steve Sisolak, during a press conference Thursday afternoon, provided slightly more up-to-date, though rounded, figures from the state’s data: 307,000 first doses administered and 82,000 second doses, totaling more than 390,000 doses.)

That means that just a little bit less than 10 percent of Nevadans have been either fully or partially vaccinated. In total, Nevada has been distributed 533,800 doses of the vaccine by the federal government.

According to the CDC, Nevada is receiving the third fewest number of doses per capita from the federal government of any state — up from second last week — at 17,330 per 100,000 residents. State officials continue to seek clarity from the federal government about why the state is receiving fewer doses on a per population basis than other states.

Nevada has administered the 10th fewest doses per capita of any state — though Nevada ranks 19th for most doses administered as a percentage of doses received, at 71.0 percent, down from 11th last week.

For more on these numbers, check out this explainer published by The Nevada Independent last week.

Among the counties, Mineral County has administered the most doses per capita, at 30,855 vaccines administered per 100,000 residents, followed by White Pine at 26,868 and Eureka at 19,271. Clark County ranks ninth at 11,142, while Washoe ranks fifth at 15,998.

For more on the vaccination process in the state, read our vaccine Q&A here.

Deaths

Nevada is still seeing a high number of new deaths reported each day, though the numbers are down from the peak in January.

As of Thursday, 30 deaths were being reported on average each day over the last seven days, down from a high of 44.9 on Jan. 14. Over the last seven days, 210 new COVID-19 deaths have been reported across the state, including:

  • 179 in Clark County
  • 15 in Washoe County
  • 5 in Nye County
  • 4 in Carson City
  • 3 in Elko County
  • 1 each in Lyon, Pershing, Storey and White Pine counties

In the last month, 1,138 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported statewide, a quarter of the 4,640 total COVID-19 deaths reported statewide since the beginning of the pandemic.

Pershing County has the number of deaths per capita in Nevada, with 28 deaths per 10,000 residents, followed by Carson City and Churchill County, each at 20, and Nye County at 19.

Nevada ranks 21st in the nation for deaths per capita, the same as last week.

Hospitalizations

COVID-19 hospitalizations in Nevada continue to decrease, though they continue to remain at high levels.

There were 879 people hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday, the last day for which data is available, down from 1,121 last week. The record, 2,025 hospitalizations, was set on Dec. 13. The low point in September was 417.

Nevada now has the sixth highest number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 per capita at 29.9 per 100,000, behind New York, Arizona, Georgia, Texas and New Jersey.

Nevada hospitals are currently staffing 7,044 beds, more than the 6,660 they are normally licensed to operate, to keep up with the demand. As of Wednesday, 75 percent of staffed hospital beds and 66 percent of ICU beds were occupied. Those numbers were 79 percent and 72 percent, respectively, in Southern Nevada and 70 percent and 53 percent in Northern Nevada.

County by county

Ten of the state’s 17 counties are considered at elevated risk for the spread of COVID-19 according to state criteria as of Thursday. Those counties not considered at risk are Storey, Churchill, Humboldt, Lander, Eureka, White Pine and Lincoln.

Counties are considered at risk for elevated spread of COVID-19 if they meet two of the following three metrics:

  • The average number of tests per day per 100,000, calculated over a 14-day period. If this number is less than 100, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000, calculated by taking the number of cases diagnosed and reported over a 30-day period. If this number is greater than 200, a county could be considered at risk.
  • The case rate per 100,000 and the test positivity rate, calculated over a 14-day period with a seven-day lag. If the case rate is greater than 50 and the test positivity rate is greater than 8.0 percent, a county could be considered at risk.

Mineral County continues to have the highest case rate in the state at 1,579 cases per 100,000 residents in the last 30 days. Clark County comes in second at 1,068 and Pershing County comes in third at 704.